webmockr: mock HTTP requests

  Scott Chamberlain FEBRUARY 20, 2018

webmockr

webmockr is an R library for stubbing and setting expectations on HTTP requests. It is a port of the Ruby gem webmock.

webmockr works by plugging in to another R package that does HTTP requests. It currently only works with crul right now, but we plan to add support for curl and httr later.

webmockr has the following high level features:

  • Stubbing HTTP requests at low http client level
  • Setting expectations on HTTP requests
  • Matching requests based any combination of HTTP method (e.g., GET/POST/PUT), URI (i.e., URL), request headers and body
  • Will soon integrate with vcr so that you can cache real HTTP responses - and easily integrate with testthat

webmockr has been on CRAN for a little while now, but I’ve recently made some improvements and am nearing another CRAN release, which is also preparation for a first release of the related vcr package. The following is a run down of major features and how to use the package, including a bit on testing at the end.


Similar art in other languages

webmockr was most closely inspired by Ruby’s webmock, but there are others out there, e.g,. HTTPretty and pook for Python, from which we’ll steal ideas as time allows.


Installation

webmockr is on CRAN, so you can install that version

install.packages("webmockr")

But I’ve been making some improvements, so you’ll probably want the dev version:

Install some dependencies

if (!requireNamespace("remotes", quietly=TRUE)) install.packages("remotes")
remotes::install_github(c("ropensci/[email protected]", "ropenscilabs/fauxpas"))

Install webmockr

remotes::install_github("ropensci/webmockr")

Load webmockr

library(webmockr)



Using webmockr

After loading webmockr

library(webmockr)

webmockr is loaded but not “turned on”. At this point webmockr doesn’t change anything about your HTTP requests.

Once you turn on webmockr:

webmockr::enable()

webmockr will now by default NOT allow real HTTP requests from the http libraries that adapters are loaded for (right now only crul).

Next, you’ll want to think about stubbing requests

Stubbing requests

Stubbing requests simply refers to the act of saying “I want all HTTP requests that match this pattern to return this thing”. The “thing” can be made up of a lot of different things.

First, load crul and enable webmockr

library(crul)
webmockr::enable()

You can stub requests based on HTTP method and uri

stub_request("get", "https://httpbin.org/get")
#> <webmockr stub> 
#>   method: get
#>   uri: https://httpbin.org/get
#>   with: 
#>     query: 
#>     body: 
#>     request_headers: 
#>   to_return: 
#>     status: 
#>     body: 
#>     response_headers: 
#>   should_timeout: FALSE
#>   should_raise: FALSE

The returned object is of class StubbedRequest, with attributes and accessors - which you usually won’t use yourself - although we use the object internally within webmockr. The object has a print method that summarizes your stub, including the HTTP method, the URI, if you set any patterns for query parameters, the query body, or request headers, and whether you set any expectations on the response, including status code, body or response headers. Last, there’s booleans for whether you set a timeout or raise expectation (more on that below).

You can check the stub registry at any time to see what stubs you have:

stub_registry()
#> <webmockr stub registry> 
#>  Registered Stubs
#>    get: https://httpbin.org/get

protip: you can clear all stubs at any time by running stub_registry_clear()

Once we have the stub, we can then do a request with crul

x <- HttpClient$new(url = "https://httpbin.org")
x$get('get')
#> <crul response> 
#>   url: https://httpbin.org/get
#>   request_headers: 
#>     User-Agent: libcurl/7.54.0 r-curl/3.1 crul/0.5.1.9210
#>     Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate
#>     Accept: application/json, text/xml, application/xml, */*
#>   response_headers: 
#>   status: 200

A response is returned that is of the same structure as a normal crul response, but no actual HTTP request was performed. The response object is a bit different from a real HTTP response in that we don’t have response headers, but you can set an expectation of response headers, and even use real response headers you’ve retrieved in real HTTP requests if you like.

Once we’ve made a request we can take a peek into the request registry:

request_registry()
#> <webmockr request registry> 
#>   Registered Requests
#>   GET https://httpbin.org/get   
#>      with headers {
#>        User-Agent: libcurl/7.54.0 r-curl/3.1 crul/0.5.0, 
#>        Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate, 
#>        Accept: application/json, text/xml, application/xml, */*
#>      } was made 1 times

(the printing behavior above is manual - if you run this you’ll see one line for each request - will make some prettier printing behavior later)

We can see that a request to https://httpbin.org/get was made with certain request headers and was made 1 time. If we make that request again the registry will then say 2 times. And so on.

You can also set the request headers that you want to match on. If you do this the request has to match the HTTP method, the URI, and the certain request headers you set.

stub_request("get", "https://httpbin.org/get") %>%
  wi_th(headers = list('User-Agent' = 'libcurl/7.51.0 r-curl/2.6 crul/0.3.6', 
                       'Accept-Encoding' = "gzip, deflate"))
#> <webmockr stub> 
#>   method: get
#>   uri: https://httpbin.org/get
#>   with: 
#>     query: 
#>     body: 
#>     request_headers: User-Agent=libcurl/7.51.0 r-curl/2.6 crul/0.3.6, Accept-Encoding=gzip, deflate
#>   to_return: 
#>     status: 
#>     body: 
#>     response_headers: 
#>   should_timeout: FALSE
#>   should_raise: FALSE

You can set the query parameters in a stub as well:

stub_request("get", "https://httpbin.org/get") %>%
  wi_th(
    query = list(hello = "world"))
#> <webmockr stub> 
#>   method: get
#>   uri: https://httpbin.org/get
#>   with: 
#>     query: hello=world
#>     body: 
#>     request_headers: 
#>   to_return: 
#>     status: 
#>     body: 
#>     response_headers: 
#>   should_timeout: FALSE
#>   should_raise: FALSE


Stubbing responses

Up until now the stubs we’ve created have only set what to match on, but have not set what to return. With to_return you can set response headers, response body, and response HTTP status code. You don’t match requests on these three things, but rather they determine what’s returned in the response.

Here, we’ll state that we want an HTTP status of 418 returned:

stub_request("get", "https://httpbin.org/get") %>%
    to_return(status = 418)
#> <webmockr stub> 
#>   method: get
#>   uri: https://httpbin.org/get
#>   with: 
#>     query: 
#>     body: 
#>     request_headers: 
#>   to_return: 
#>     status: 418
#>     body: 
#>     response_headers: 
#>   should_timeout: FALSE
#>   should_raise: FALSE


Stubbing HTTP exceptions

Sometimes its useful in your stubs to say that you expect a particular HTTP error/exception.

webmockr has two functions for this:

  • to_raise: raise any HTTP exception. pass in any http exception from the fauxpas package
  • to_timeout: raise an HTTP timeout exception. this is it’s own function since timeout exceptions are rather common and one may want to use them often

Here, with to_raise we pass in an HTTP exception, in this case the HTTPBadRequest exception:

library(fauxpas)
stub_request("get", "https://httpbin.org/get?a=b") %>% 
    to_raise(fauxpas::HTTPBadRequest)
#> <webmockr stub> 
#>   method: get
#>   uri: https://httpbin.org/get?a=b
#>   with: 
#>     query: 
#>     body: 
#>     request_headers: 
#>   to_return: 
#>     status: 
#>     body: 
#>     response_headers: 
#>   should_timeout: FALSE
#>   should_raise: HTTPBadRequest
x <- HttpClient$new(url = "https://httpbin.org")
x$get('get', query = list(a = "b"))
#> Error: Bad Request (HTTP 400).
#>  - The request could not be understood by the server due to malformed syntax. The client SHOULD NOT repeat the request without modifications.

With to_timeout a matched request to our stub will then return a timeout error:

stub_request("post", "https://httpbin.org/post") %>% 
    to_timeout()
#> <webmockr stub> 
#>   method: post
#>   uri: https://httpbin.org/post
#>   with: 
#>     query: 
#>     body: 
#>     request_headers: 
#>   to_return: 
#>     status: 
#>     body: 
#>     response_headers: 
#>   should_timeout: TRUE
#>   should_raise: FALSE
x <- HttpClient$new(url = "https://httpbin.org")
x$post('post')
#> Error: Request Timeout (HTTP 408).
#>  - The client did not produce a request within the time that the server was prepared to wait. The client MAY repeat the request without modifications at any later time.

Check out fauxpas for more information about HTTP exceptions.


Allowing real requests

You can always disable webmockr by using webmockr::disable(), which completely disables mocking.

You can also allow some real requests while still using webmockr.

One way to allow some requests is to execute webmockr_allow_net_connect(), which doesn’t disable webmockr completely - it allows real HTTP requests to be made that have no stubs associated.

Another way is to disallow all requests except for certain URIs using webmockr_disable_net_connect(). For example, if we run webmockr_disable_net_connect("google.com") no real HTTP requests are allowed other than those that match "google.com".

You can also allow only localhost HTTP requests with the allow_localhost parameter in the webmockr_configure() function. Run webmockr_configure(allow_localhost = TRUE), and then all localhost requests will be allowed while all non-locahost requests will not be allowed. allow_localhost works for all the localhost variants: localhost, 127.0.0.1, and 0.0.0.0.

You can check whether you are allowing real requests with webmockr_net_connect_allowed(), and you can see your webmockr configuration with webmockr_configuration().


Storing actual HTTP responses

webmockr doesn’t do that. Check out vcr for that.

Some have noted that in some cases storing actual http responses can get to be too cumbersome (maybe too much disk space, or other reasons) - and have reverted from using a tool like vcr that caches real responses to using something like webmockr that only “stubs” fake responses.

There’s many options for testing a library that does HTTP requests:

  1. Do actual HTTP requests
  2. Stub HTTP requests with a tool like webmockr
  3. Cache real HTTP responses with a too like vcr

webmockr for your test suite

You can use webmockr for your test suite right now. Here’s a quick example of using webmockr with testthat

library(crul)
library(testthat)

Make a stub

stub_request("get", "https://httpbin.org/get") %>%
   to_return(body = "success!", status = 200)
#> <webmockr stub> 
#>   method: get
#>   uri: https://httpbin.org/get
#>   with: 
#>     query: 
#>     body: 
#>     request_headers: 
#>   to_return: 
#>     status: 200
#>     body: success!
#>     response_headers: 
#>   should_timeout: FALSE
#>   should_raise: FALSE

Check that it’s in the stub registry

stub_registry()
#> <webmockr stub registry> 
#>  Registered Stubs
#>    get: https://httpbin.org/get   | to_return:  with body "success!"  with status 200

Make the request

z <- crul::HttpClient$new(url = "https://httpbin.org")$get("get")

Run tests (nothing returned means it passed)

expect_is(z, "HttpResponse")
expect_equal(z$status_code, 200)
expect_equal(z$parse("UTF-8"), "success!")




Todo

There are a number of things to still get done with webmockr


Feedback!

We’d love to get some eyes on this; to sort out problems that will no doubt arise from real world scenarios; to flesh out new use cases we hadn’t thought of, etc.

Open an issue: https://github.com/ropensci/webmockr/issues/new